amateur radio nets australia

We all love to communicate, why not take a trip around the world with radio!! No internet connection or mobile phone signal is needed! Talk to other amateur radio operators across the world, maybe even in unusual places or as far as space!

Yes, that’s right, the international space station carries amateur radio equipment on board and there are always licensed amateurs among the crew who enjoy using it to communicate with operators all over the world. Youtube features several recordings of amateur radio operators communicating with space crew!

What to listen to

You can listen to local radio stations from around Australia, and even the world via shorwave.

 HF aircraft channels, weather reports, and amateur radio nets. For those new to listening on the HF bands, nets are an ‘on-the-air’ gathering of amateur radio operators. chatting and passing messages, normally via organised radio nets, on a predetermined frequency at the same time every day.

These nets can range from discussions on areas of interest, to emergency messages or simply as a regular gathering of friends for conversation. 

Here are some of the most common radio nets.

DX Nets

DX nets are one of the most fascinating and are often organized to help amateur radio operators make contact with stations in distant locations or regions where amateur radio operators are scarce. 

Imagine randomly tuning across amateur bands and being able to listen to another station you may not normally be able to hear, by simply tuning into a DX net.

Club Nets

Amateur radio clubs organise nets between members on a regular basis. The topics are often of special interest and can vary from vintage radio equipment, locating unique stations in Australia and around the world, using and discussing the AM mode of voice transmission and many more.

These nets foster communications members across geographic locations and special interest clubs, and make fascinating listening for shortwave enthusiasts, whilst providing an open communications link for those in isolation.

Traffic Nets.

Traffic nets operate primarily to relay written messages. Both routine and emergency messages have been passed on behalf of others as a public service mission for decades.

Often used for training purposes or during emergencies such as natural disasters when there are power outages traffic nets are used to pass on crucial information to the affected areas. Often relayed by emergency services or ham radio users where possible.

If you are looking to add a shortwave radio to your collection we have a fantastic selection available on our webshop like The Tecsun PL880 Radio 

*Info from the Wireless Institute of Australia 

 

How to be prepared for a power cut

                                                                                                                          image via Image via https://www.abc.net.au/news/

At 2 pm on Tues 25th May 2021, a fire broke out in a turbine at the Callide power station in Central QLD causing three generators to be shut down. The scenario of a hydrogen-filled generator exploding or failing mechanically causing hydrogen leaks and then also oil leaks, is probably the worst-case scenario in a coal-fired power station, according to Union representatives.

A further domino effect followed, tripping plants further down the network and causing an electricity outage of almost 500,000 homes from northern New South Wales up to far north Queensland. 

 Chaos ensued with a black-out affecting hundreds of thousands of homes, the Brisbane city traffic lights, shopping centers, sewage treatment plants, and even Gold Coast trams.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) requested consumers in Queensland temporarily reduce their energy usage where safe to do so

Thankfully nobody was injured by this incident however, this is a stark reminder that significant power events, similarly, significant weather events ( the two are often related) can occur anywhere at any time.

Is your home prepared for such events?

How to prepare yourself for a power outage.

A severe power outage can last for days, so its a good idea to set aside a day once a year to spend 10 minutes making sure you are prepared if the sudden event of a power outage occurs.

Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity. Plan for batteries and other alternative power sources to meet your needs when the power goes out, such as a portable charger or power bank. Have flashlights for every household member. Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.

Make sure you have an emergency radio that can be hand-cranked or solar powered so that you can receive essential emergency broadcasts and instructions when other forms of communications are down. Many top emergency radios feature additional safety features including a flashlight, emergency alarm to attract attention and USB charging. 

How to protect yourself during a power outage.

  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges. Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment, or electronics. Power may return with momentary surges or spikes that can cause damage.
  • Use a generator if you have one, but ONLY outdoors and away from windows to minimise exposure to carbon monoxide.
  • Do not use a gas stove or oven to heat your home.
  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed and have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.
  • Tune into your local radio emergency broadcast for updates and directions if you are in an effected area
  • Grab your emergency kit and keep it close.

Thank you to ready.gov for these tips.

Emergency kits are essential in every household, because you don’t need them till you do.

Do you have an emergency kit prepared at home? Click here to see the full list of what essential items you will need to have packed and ready to go. What is in an emergency kit.

Don’t have an emergency radio yet?

We recommend the Best Emergency Radio which is our highest performance AM/FM/SW Solar Powered Radio with inbuilt Solar Panel and Hand Crank Dynamo Charging. Additional features much needed during an emergency are a LED torch and personal alarm, a siren to gain the attention of emergency services and an inbuilt USB charger.

We recommend the DE13 Emergency AM/FM/SW Solar Radio which is an economy model, featuring a torch, personal alarm, inbuilt Solar Panel, and Dynamo hand crank charger that allows you to recharge the internal battery or charge any device by USB or mini USB including your mobile phone. This is the perfect radio to keep for any emergencies.

Click here to shop these products in our online store.

 

bom radio receivers

When you are out to sea, it is crucial to keep on top of the weather forecasts, a change in swell and wind can change the sailing landscape from smooth to challenging.

The Australian Bureau of Meterorology (BOM) Marine Forecast Service provides regular weather forecasts and warnings Australia wide.

This information is broadcast on HF radio for mariners in two formats:

a. Broadcast (voice) of marine weather warnings, forecasts and observations.

b. Broadcast (radiofax images) of marine weather forecast and analysis maps.

The Bureau broadcasts its marine weather HF radio services for high seas and Australian coastal areas from transmitters at Charleville in Queensland and Wiluna in Western Australia. Identifiers are VMC (for services from Charleville) and VMW (for services from Wiluna). Services use USB (F3C) modulation.

VMC (Australia Weather East) broadcasts for the following areas:

· Coastal Waters areas off Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

· High Seas for the Northern, Southern, North Eastern and South Eastern high seas areas.

Marine weather warnings are broadcast on the hour (on the half-hour in CST) for NT, Qld, NSW, Vic, SA and Tasmanian coastal waters zones and for all high seas areas. The broadcast is available on the following frequencies (kHz):

· Day-time (0700 – 1800 EST): 4426, 8176, 12365, 16546

· Night-time (1800 – 0700 EST): 2201, 6507, 8176, 12365

Navigation Maritime Safety Information notices are broadcast at 25 past each hour on 8176 kHz. Marine forecasts and observations are broadcast from Charleville (VMC) on a four hour repeat cycle, according to the schedule below:

All times are in Eastern Standard time (0700-1800EST) DAY-Time schedule

0730hrs Queensland

0830hrs High Seas (Northern, North Eastern, South Eastern, and Southern areas)

0930hrs New South Wales, Victoria

1030hrs Tasmania

This schedule repeats every four hours until 1800EST after which time, the nigh-time frequencies are used.

When daylight savings is in force, add one hour to EST and CST to obtain Eastern and central daylight time equivalents.

 

VMW (Australia Weather West) broadcasts for the following areas:

· Coastal Waters areas off South Australia, Western Australia and Northern Territory.

· High Seas for the Northern, Western and Southern high seas areas.

Marine weather warnings are broadcast on the hour (on the half-hour in CST) for Qld Gulf, NT, WA and SA coastal waters zones and for all high seas areas. The broadcast is available on the following frequencies (kHz):

· Day-time (0700 – 1800 WST): 4149, 8113, 12362, 16528

· Night-time (1800 – 0700 WST): 2056, 6230, 8113, 12362

Navigation Maritime Safety Information notices are broadcast at 25 past each hour on 8176 kHz. Marine forecasts and observations are broadcast from Wiluna (VMW) on a four hour repeat cycle according to the schedule below:

All times are in Western Standard time (0700-1800WST)

0730hrs Western Australia (Northern Zones: NT-WA Border to North West Cape) NT

0830hrs Western Australia (Western Zones: North West Cape to Cape Naturaliste) Western Australia (Southern Zones: Cape Naturaliste to WA-SA Border)

0930hrs South Australia

1030hrs Queensland (Gulf waters) High Seas (Northern, Western, and Southern areas)

This schedule repeats every four hours until 1800WST after which night-time frequencies are used.

When daylight savings is in force, add one hour to EST and CST to obtain Eastern and Central daylight time equivalents.

 

BOM Marine Weatherfax service:

The BOM Marine Weatherfax service is also broadcast from Charelville (VMC) in the east and Wiluna (VMW) in the west. Both transmitters have a power rating of 1Kw, utilising F3C transmission.

Charleville: Call Sign VMC

 

Frequency: 2628, 5100, 11030, 13920, 20469 kHz

Broadcast (UTC) 0900-1900, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 1900-0900.

 

WilunaL: Call Sign VMW

 

Frequency: 5755, 7535, 10555, 15615, 18060 kHz

Broadcast (UTC) 1100-2100, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 2100-110

VMC & VMW Radio Fax Schedule

Time (UTC) Description of Item and Current Chart
0000* Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0015 VMC/VMW Schedule – 2 pages
0045 VMC/VMW Broadcast Information
0100 Recommended Frequencies for VMC (Charleville) – 3 pages
0131 Recommended Frequencies for VMW (Wiluna) – 3 pages
0203 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
0245 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0300 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0315 Voice Broadcast Information for VMC and VMW
0345* Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0400 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0430 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
0500* Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
0600 Asian (Area A) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 0000
0623 Asian (Area B) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 0000
0645 Asian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0730 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0745 Australian Total Wave Height and Direction Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0800 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0830 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0845 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0600
0900 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
0915 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
1015 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+24) valid 0000
1030 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1045 Southern Hemisphere Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 0000
1100 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+36) valid 0000
1115 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0600
1130 Asian Sea Surface Temperature Analysis
1145 VMC/VMW Information Notice
1200 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1215 VMC/VMW Schedule – 2 pages
1245 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1315 South Pacific Ocean Total Waves (H+48) Valid 0000
1330 Indian Ocean Total Waves (H+48) Valid 0000
1345 Pacific Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures
1400 Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures
1415 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+48) valid 0000
1430 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 1200
1500 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
1515 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1530 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
1600 Asian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1630 Recommended Frequencies for VMC (Charleville) – 3 pages
1701 Recommended Frequencies for VMW (Wiluna) – 3 pages
1800 Asian (Area A) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 1200
1823 Asian (Area B) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 1200
1915 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1930 Australian Total Wave Height and Direction Forecast (H+24) Valid 1200
1945 Australian Primary Swell Waves Height Forecast (H+24) Valid 1200
2000 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
2015 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+24) valid 0000
2030 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis (Manual) Valid 1800
2215 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+36) valid 0000
2230 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast, Days 1 and 2
2245 Southern Hemisphere Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 1200
2300 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast, Days 3 and 4
2315 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+48) valid 0000
2330 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
2345 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 1200
*The following charts are repeat broadcasts on 11030 kHz only via a directional aerial pointing from Charleville (VMC) towards Tasmania.
0000 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0345 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0500 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
Suitable Receivers:

emergency weather warnings radio

Any HF receiver capable of tuning the correct frequencies and receiving SSB transmissions will be suitable for VMC and VMW voice transmissions. To decode facsimilie transmissions an external decoder will be required. The user must be able to access a headphones or line output socket on the receiver to facilitate connection.**

The provision of an external antenna socket is an advantage, this will allow a single wire connection to a backstay or other length of wire to improve reception over the standard telescopic whip.

All broadcast use USB and that mode must be selected on the receiver.

Suitable receivers in the Tecsun range are:
S-2000 desktop, PL-600, PL-660, PL-330, PL-880, PL-990, PL-365, S-8800,

Shop these radios here on our online webshop.

Information source: Australian Bureau of Meteorology

**There exists a radio fax decoder which operates on both Adroid and IOS phones and tablets, which does not require a wired connection.

Simply place your phone or tablet near the speaker of the receiver and the decoder will start.

The App is available from the App Store (HF Weather Fax Marine Radio Fascimile Decoder App) from Black Cat Systems- https://www.blackcatsystems.com/index.html

PL600 review by troy from free range sailing australia

We were delighted to watch this review by Troy & Pascale from Free Range Sailing who are currently exploring our beautiful country in a 30-foot yacht called Mirrool.

Whilst sailing through northern Australia as well as the west coast of Tasmania there are limited coastal stations broadcasting on VHF.

Using a shortwave radio like the Tecsun PL600 was really beneficial for Troy & Pascale to receive up to date weather forecasts, crucial when sailing.

 

Most meteorological bureaus will publish the times and frequencies ( these change, day/night) that you will be able to pick up the weather schedule via your shortwave radio.

The radio Pascale used was the Tecsun PL600 Worldband radio. At just $129 The Tecsun PL600 World Band Radio is the perfect entry product to the world of shortwave listening and an essential when traveling to isolated areas.

To view the full video click here.

To learn more about the Tecsun PL600 a fantastic entry-level shortwave radio priced at just $129 click here

If you would like to follow Troy and Pascale’s intrepid adventures ( highly recommended) click here

shortwave radio saves airplane.

 

Imagine flying off the coast over a vast ocean when your communications are lost.

Regular weather condition reports, particularly regarding strong headwinds are vital to the successful flight and landing of  an airplane.

 

On July 9, an air ambulance departing Santiago De Chile to collect a patient on Easter Island lost satellite communications more than 1600Km from land.

Out of VHF range and with an inoperative satellite link, the fast thinking pilot tuned the aircraft HF radio to 7100Khz, the net frequency of the Peruvian Refief Chain who had just finished conducting a training exercise.

Fortunately for the pilot, 2 amateur radio operators Guillermo Guerra OA4DTU and Giancario Passalacqua OA4DSN, were still on frequency and able to respond to the aircraft. Together they communicated via HF with the aircraft and by telephone with the Ocean Air Control who have control of aircraft movements in the 32 million square kilometre Pacific Ocean Area off the coast of Chile.

shortwave radio helps distressed airplane

Meanwhile other amateur radio operators rejoined the frequency ready to provide assistance if necessary.

OAC were already in a state of alert since losing communications with the aircraft and as the backup HF communications system at Easter Island was out of service.

After 10 or so phone calls between the amateurs and OAC, providing aircraft position reports and advising weather conditions over a period of 3 hours, VHF communications was established with the control tower on Easter Island, and the aircraft made a successful approach and landing.

Have you considered or XIEGU G90 Transceiver?


Xiegu G90 Australia

The XIEGU is available on our website, click here to read all about it!

Article written by Tecsun radios Australia from Source: qrznow.com

Shortwave radio, the original and most crucial form of radio communication in our history, and dropped by many countries 20 years ago, is set for a resurgence!

Used heavily during the Cold War, shortwave was vital for communications in isolated areas.

After the war, listenership dwindled and as the equipment aged and the energy bills continued to accrue, one of the first in line for budget cuts was shortwave, with no importance placed on replacing it.

 

Not unlike the song, “Video Killed the Radio Star”, many say that satellites and the internet killed shortwave radio.

 

Really it is a combination of technology and content delivered directly to the savvy FM listener and streamed to the cell phone obsessed user generally at a reduced cost compared to shortwave. 

 

As Shortwave dwindled, radio began being broadcast in FM and DAB modes to radios, devices, and laptops, with thousands of listening options. 

Many new broadcasters began piggybacking on the local popular informative radio stations.

 

This new technology, however, in many countries is not without its issues. At first, it might appear that these are cheaper and more modern options, but slow buffering times, multiplexed DAB+, excessive and expensive cost of data in many countries, as well as a listener’s preference for anonymity has seen a return to shortwave.

 

As mentioned in previous articles the emerging ability to transmit shortwave radio digitally using DRM ( Digital Radio Mondiale) has seen a resurgence in the use of shortwave due to its wide coverage and heavily reduced cost.

 

Specifically China has opted to use DRM Shortwave to provide full coverage to the areas between the large cities.

 

China National Radio broadcasts from five upgraded sites 80 hours a day with seven to eight transmitters sending shortwave DRM to most areas of North China, East China, South China and Southwest China. Russia is also airing DRM in shortwave over huge areas of Siberia.

India is now looking to increase its three DRM shortwave transmitters for further national and international reach. 

 

Several CRN transmitters beam enormous DRM signals into our part of the world daily.

 

Indonesia and Brazil are also said to have expressed interest in adapting their shortwave analog over to DRM for greater coverage. 

 

As mentioned previously Vanuatu, has recently opted for DRM shortwave to save lives in disaster situations by using its integrated emergency warning capability, and a site in the United States has recently started broadcasting in DRM the popular Radio Marti programs toward central and Latin America.

 

As many areas of the world are re-discovering the value of shortwave we may see the resurgence of shortwave being replaced by its new digital form.

 

Are you interested in listening to Shortwave radio? Imagine picking up and decoding radio stations from remote areas of the world? Re connect with the world during this time of isolation.

 

Tecsun Radios Australia has a great range of Shortwave and Digital radios available.

Shop the range here

The future of shortwave

 

The future of Shortwave is looking bright as the BBC Shortwave transmissions service of two decades ago is being revisited.

 

In a time where people are distancing themselves and experiencing isolation. Shortwave may just be what the world needs to unite all cultures!

 

People who enjoy shortwave and for those who are interested in shortwave radio something interesting has emerged from the  High Frequency Co-Ordination Conference (HFCC), a non-governmental association.  

 

Due to the fact that many of the old transmitters needed to be replaced or upgraded a decision to revisit the need for shortwave and consideration to re-launch the BBC shortwave broadcast  service (cut 20 years ago) has been undertaken. Modern technology allows greater coverage and lower operating costs, re-energising the enthusiasm for shortwave broadcasting.

 

Even in this high tech world, there are still so many developing and free world countries relying heavily on Shortwave radio. Not everybody in the world has smart phones, broadband, connected cars or enough disposable income.

 

Shortwave defies cultural, religious and geographical barriers, Shortwave is free and unlike most platforms available it can be consumed anonymously.

For some countries, much of their information and media is censored, so receiving updates through shortwave from neighboring countries can be the only source they can access.

 

Many, especially in North Korea which are rated as the second most censored country in the world, tune in to cross border broadcasts despite serious consequences if caught by the Kim Jong-Un regime.

The BBC Shortwave transmission services used to broadcast to most of the world, over time however, many were cut, limiting broadcasts  to larger audiences in Africa and part of Asia. 

Currently, the major shortwave broadcasters are BBC, Voice of America, All India Radio, China Radio International, Radio Japan, Radio Romania, Radio New Zealand, Radio France International, Radio Taiwan International, KBS Korea and Voice of Turkey and many more.

 

Reinstating the previous BBC Broadcasts would mean the world of shortwave could be enjoyed cross culturally again especially in a time where boarders are closed to each other and people are feeling isolated.

 

 “Shortwave is just short of a miracle, actually. When it is beamed at an angle, it hits the ionosphere. A mirror around the Earth and then it falls like a ball at great distances, beyond the horizon. Thus these transmissions reach listeners over large areas, continents and beyond. Two or three high-power transmitters can potentially cover the entire world.”

                                Ruxandra Obreja ( chairman of Digital Radio Mondiale.)

 

Are you looking for a radio whilst self isolating that is capable or shortwave listening?

Here are our picks.

Tecsun S-8800 High Performance AM/FM Radio.  A true Broadcast Listeners Receiver  designed to provide maximum performance on the AM (MW) bands, allowing listeners to receive fringe AM radio stations with unmatched audio clarity

Tecsun SL-880

Tecsun PL600 World Band Radio provides reception of the shortwave, medium wave, long wave, and FM broadcast bands. The Tecsun PL600 World Band Radio’s PLL synthesised design ensures excellent frequency stability.

Tecsun pl600

To shop the full range of our radios and antennas, click HERE

Radio licence applications soars.

What you need to do to prepare for a natural disaster or emergency including what essentials you will need to pack in your emergency kit.

Its important to have a discussion with your family on what you would do in the event of a fire/ flood or other natural disaster event before the actual event takes place.

Its important to discuss the following.

How will you access emergency alerts and messages and monitor events? 

The best way of receiving event alerts and updates is via radio. ABC broadcasts hourly updates, more if needed in the local area to keep you informed. In many cases Emergency Services will call the radio station directly. Radio is also the failsafe method of receiving these reports when power is cut and networks are down which often happens during natural disasters

Make a list of radio frequencies of the local ABC and Community radio stations, so you know where to listen. You can find our guide here

In an emergency dial 000. Access to 000 is available on all mobile networks regardless of which network you use. Roaming arrangements are in place so you can use any available network.You can even dial 000 on a phone with no SIM.

Download the “Emergency +” app onto your phone. Do this before any emergency and take note of your GPS location. You might need this for emergency services if they have to find you. The Emergency + App wont work without mobile phone coverage.

Tune in to your local radio, local ABC/emergency broadcaster frequency. You may want to consider a solar powered or battery operated radio because power is often the first thing to go in emergency situations.

If you still have internet keep an eye on the BOM app and investigate your local Flood/ natural disaster and fire apps like the Rural Fire Service “Fires Near Me” App.

         

 If you are driving, keep updated on road conditions and closures by checking the NSW Transport “Live Traffic” App. There are similar Apps in most states.

At what point would you leave your home?What will be your sign to leave? It could be smoke or fire in your area, lightning and heavy rain or floodwater approaching your property.

Where will you go? Where is there a meeting place that’s safe and away from the disaster area? It might be a friend or relative’s place, or even a shopping centre. Most regional towns have a designated “safe place”. Most local council or community associations have a designated “Safe Place” for residents to go in an emergency.

Find out where your “Safe Place” is located.

What will you take? What would be your essentials you would like to take with you if you were forced to leave your home

Make sure you have an emergency kit prepared and ready to grab when needed. Unfortunately you don’t need an emergency kit until you really do.

 

PREPARE YOUR EMERGENCY KIT.

Pack a backpack with the following supplies and keep it somewhere safe that is easily accessed when needed.

Storing items in airtight plastic containers and sealer bags will help keep your belongings dry and in good condition both while in storage and during the emergency situation.

Here is a list of your essential items to pack.

  • Flashlight
  • Personal medication
  • Bottled water. Allow 2L per person per day minimum.
  • Food, non perishable, as required..
  • Manual can opener
  • Matches in a waterproof container
  • Candles
  • Cash- if the power is out then the ATMS wont work.
  • Phone “power bank”. Make sure it is changed at all times.
  • Extra batteries for your flashlight
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust masks to help filter contaminated air- P2 masks are best for dust and smoke.
  • Toilet paper, moist towelettes etc for personal sanitation
  • Local maps
  • Sharp knife (penknife)

Repack expired items as needed and re pack/ check your emergency kit every year.

Don’t have an emergency radio yet?

We reccomend the DE13 which features light, alarm, inbuilt Solar Panel and Dynamo hand crank charger that allow you to recharge the internal battery or charge any device by  USB or mini USB including your mobile phone. This is the perfect radio to keep for any emergencies

                                                                                 

To get yours, Click here to be directed to this product in our online store.

 

One of the oldest and trusted services.

In the modern age where internet technology, social media and informational apps reign supreme the Vanuatu Broadcasting Television Corporation (VBTC) is investing AUD$12 million in upgrading its national radio service through its shortwave and medium wave (AM) service.

VBTC chief executive officer, Francis Herman says In Vanuatu many of the villagers do not receive television transmissions and currently only 30% receive radio transmissions. 

Radio Vanuatu is the only viable means of reaching Vanuatu’s rural population.

With the new upgrade that coverage will increase to 100% right across the 80-plus Islands of Vanuatu, connecting the country.

As listed by the United Nations, Vanuatu is one of the most disaster-prone countries in the world and regularly experiences earthquakes, cyclones and floods.

Information is crucial during these events.

Shortwave radio is an essential complement to Vanuatu’s national radio service due to its far reaching capabilities even when the power, internet or local networks are down.

Technology commentator Peter Marks said “Shortwave comes from over the horizon it will continue to work even when local conditions are difficult like extreme weather that might knock out local FM and AM stations and internet,” 

 

A cost effective way to reach the population of Vanuatu to deliver important messages.

VBTC chief executive officer, Francis Herman says “Radio as you know is cost effective, people can pick it up on their phone, in the villages where television can not reach, radio is the companion for people,” .

“We have general elections in March next year, we are about to head into the cyclone season beginning in November and so its important, it’s crucial that the people of Vanuatu can get access to a reliable and credible broadcaster,” Mr Herman said.

This is why investing in a national shortwave service is even more important than ever even in the modern age.

 

Radio Vanuatu can be found at. 

RADIO FREQUENCY 
MEDIUM WAVE1125KHZ
SHORTWAVE3945KHZ (NIGHT TIME)
7260 KHZ (DAY TIME)
FM100 MHZ (VILA & SANTO)
98 MHZ (TANNA & SANTO)

Radio Vanuatu features a morning show with Dorinda Mabon from 5:30am till 9am

Marie-Noelle Kaltak hosts the mid morning show and evenings are hosted by Florence Vanua.

Do you currently listen to Vanuatu radio? We would love to see your listeners report.

Comment on the post below or email to hello@tecsunradios.com.au

Images via Radio Vanuatu website.