shortwave radio in the NT

A controversial decision in 2017 lead to the ABC turning off its domestic shortwave radio service, much to the disappointment and anger of remote listeners. It’s reasoning for turning off the shortwave broadcasts was that it would only affect a small number of listeners and in fact save operating costs of $1.9M, which could be re-invested in providing infrastructure of digital services located in populated regional areas.

Many industry groups were outraged, particularly in remote areas of the Northern Territory where residents had come to rely on the service as their only regular source of news and entertainment.

In February 2011, cyclone Yasi crossed the Australian east coast between Cairns and Townsville, causing enormous damage and knocking out all local communications. 

Radio Australia carried ABC Queensland coverage of the storm, which was extraordinary. 

The ABC shortwave transmitter at Shepparton Victoria was activated on 9710 and 6080 kHz, and the giant curtain array antenna pointed to Far North Queensland. This broadcast provided emergency information, sheltering information, updates, and calls from listeners in the midst of the storm.

The enormous signal could easily be heard in Sydney and Brisbane on any shortwave radio.

“The ABC expansion of its digital platforms in capital cities provides no benefits to those Australians living in remote areas, and the withdrawal of domestic shortwave services has been seen as a real kick in the guts”. 

“What people take for granted in the cities is a luxury for those living in the bush, who rely on the HF shortwave radio services as a reliable source of news, weather information, and entertainment, There are numerous examples where ABC domestic shortwave has been the only source of information to remote area residents during a weather-related emergencies,” said Garry Cratt owner of Tecsun Radios Australia, who made a submission to government at the time.

Cyclone Yasi approaching the east coast of Australia, Feb 2 2011.

Photo source: Bureau of Meteorology

The federal Labor party has announced that if elected next year, they will provide the ABC with $2M in funding to re-establish the shortwave funding across the territory.

Federal Member for Solomon Luke Gosling mentioned that he was approached by community groups who were angry at the axing of ABC shortwave and said” when shortwave was cut there was a lot of angst, so it will be a good thing to bring it back to keep people on the land and waters connected. Many thousands will benefit from this [bringing back shortwave]”

Article source: NT Country hour, ABC News, Bureau of Meteorology.

 

 

Halloween Radio 2021Picture this, a family huddled around the radio on Halloween, the sun is going down and a spooky story unfolds, everybody listens intently, imagination is working overtime, a bell chimes, there is a scream…. 

Before television, radio was the entertainment of choice in homes across Australia. During the 20th century,  radio broadcasts varied greatly, with something for everyone including music shows, talks on politics, gardening and various topics, sporting event coverage, news, and of course serial dramas! 

One of the most popular genres broadcast was serial thrillers! Not too dissimilar to many of the thriller podcasts that are popular today. Instead of reading a book one could go about what they were doing while being entertained by this gripping episode broadcast across the airwaves.

Having gained huge popularity in the USA, many thriller scripts were sent over to Australia and adapted locally, featuring well known Australian actors of the time like Ruth Cracknell

On “All Hallows Eve” 1941 A witch’s Tale was broadcast to Australian audiences. 

A witches Tale was written especially as a Halloween broadcast and adapted for Australian radio.

The original American series of The Witch’s Tale was significant as the earliest horror program produced for radio. It was first heard in May 1931 out of radio station WOR in New York City.

The opening sets the tone of the episode, with the chiming of a bell, an eerie voice informing you that you will hear tales from Nancy the witch of Salem and her cat Satan accompanied by sinister music and sound effects.

The Brisbane Telegraph described the program in 1947 as ‘not the sort of radio program the timid would enjoy listening to when alone in the house after nightfall.

In fact, Newspapers began to receive letters from outraged listeners protesting the broadcasts of such horror and the damaging effect it had on young people.

‘Do parents realise the serious damage that may be done to the minds of their children by the horror story of the radio? One serial broadcast from a local station between 6 and 7pm for children could cause untold mischief to many an innocent child … This mental cruelty is worse than punching a child in the face’ – CT Turnbull, Assistant Secretary of the Newcastle Young Men’s Christian Association, Newcastle Morning Herald, 6 June 1941.

Since we are so close to Halloween, want to hear that very tale from 1941 yourself? You are in luck!!

The National Film and Sound Archive of Australia have provided some Samples of these thriller podcasts/ Click here to listen to A Witches Tale broadcast in 1941 (program duration 26 minutes).

Information courtesy of the NFSA.

What is the contest?

Every year a contest is held that promotes HF contacts to and from amateur radio stations in the Oceana region as well as contacts between stations inside Oceania. Points are allocated for each contact depending upon the location. There is no penalty for working non-Oceania stations but contacts between non-Oceania stations will score no points or multiplier credits. Each contact or QSO is credited with twenty points on 160M; ten points on 80M; five points on 40M; one point on 20M; two points on 15M; and three points on 10M. Note that the same station may only be counted once on each band for contact points.

The aim is for Oceania entrants to contact as many stations as possible, anywhere in the world !! In 2020 over 1600 stations participated.

Oceania shortwave listeners should try to log as many stations as possible both inside and outside Oceania.

When is it on?

This year there are two separate contests held a week apart. The phone contest will be held on Saturday October 2nd from 06:00 UTC to Sunday, October 3rd 06:00 UTC . The CW contest will be held on Saturday 9 October from 06:00 UTC to Sunday 10 October 06:00 UTC.

Enter one contest or both! See summarised notes provided by the contest holders.

For a clearer map of Oceania click here

SPECIAL NOTES FOR THE 2021 CONTEST

  1. A reminder that the Phone and CW sections each start at 06:00 on Saturday and end at 06:00 on Sunday.
  2. The deadline for submitting logs is 31 October 2021.
  3. Entrants are reminded of the need to observe any COVID related restrictions (e.g. social distancing and travel constraints) that may be in place for the contest dates.
  4. Electronic logs are to be submitted using the form at https://ocdx.contesting.com/submitlog.php. Please contact the Contest Committee at info@oceaniadxcontest.com if you are encountering difficulty in submitting your log.
  5. Electronic logs are to be in Cabrillo format which is generated by all popular contest logging software programs. Alternatively, entrants can use the forms at http://www.b4h.net/cabforms.
  6. Only one entry may be submitted by each operator or team of operators (Rule 6a).
  7. If the station worked does not provide a serial number for the Oceania DX Contest, then log the received number as 001. See Rule 8.
  8. A reminder that logs from Single Band entrants must record all contacts made during the contest period, even if on other bands. Only contacts made on the band specified in the Cabrillo header or summary sheet will be used for scoring purposes.
  9. Indonesia entrants are reminded that the Indonesia amateur radio regulations do not permit the YH club prefix to be used in the OCDX and other national or international amateur radio contests. Only the 7A, &I, 8A or 8I club prefixes may be used for this purpose.
  10. All entrants are reminded that UTC must be used for recording the date and time of each QSO and that care must be taken to ensure the times are recorded correctly.

The Phone and CW contests are scored separately.

Prefixes are multipliers (e.g. N8, W8, WD8, HG1, HG19, KC2, OE2, OE25, LY1000, VK2 …) on each band on which you work them.

    • For multiplier purposes, prefixes and callsigns without numbers are notionally assigned a zero e.g. PA/N8BJQ counts as PA0, and XE/KT5W counts as XE0. All callsigns should however be logged as sent.
    • Maritime mobile, mobile, /A, /E, /J, /P, or interim license class identifiers do not count as prefixes.
    • Special event, commemorative and other unique prefix stations are welcome.
  • The total score is the (sum of the Contact Points) multiplied by the (sum of the Multipliers).

 CATEGORIES

  • Transmitting Single Operator:
    • QRP (SO QRP) 5 watts
    • low power (SO LP) 100 watts
    • high power (SO HP) the lesser of license limit or 1500 watts
  • Transmitting Multiple Operators
    • Single Transmitter (M1)
    • Two Transmitters (M2)
    • Multiple Transmitters (MM)
  • Short Wave Listener (SWL)
  • DXcluster assistance is permitted in all categories, with the usual restrictions (see the full rules for details)
  • Entries on individual bands are supported.
  • World Stations operate in a separate category to Oceania stations

 CQs and EXCHANGES

  • Participants typically call “CQ Oceania” on phone, and “CQ OC” on CW.
  • Contest exchanges are signal reports plus a serial number, starting at 001.
  • Be careful to log callsigns and reports accurately, especially multipliers, since typos can be costly.
  • If someone does not send you a serial number, log them as serial number 001.
  • To help the adjudicators cross-check other entrants’ logs, please log every completed QSO:
    • Log zero-point QSOs (e.g. if DX stations work other DX stations)’
    • Log any duplicate QSOs’
    • Single band entrants: log your QSOs made on all bands (the Cabrillo header tells us which band you are entering)’
    • If you participate but choose not to enter, a checklog would be welcome for the same reason.

 SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY

  • The OCDX contests are adjudicated electronically, hence we need your electronic logs.
  • If possible, use contest logging software to generate a Cabrillo file, then upload it using the on-line submission form.
  • Otherwise please use the online form or some other means to generate a valid plain text column-aligned Cabrillo file, then upload that.Provided you made less than 50 contacts, you can mail in a legible paper log with a summary sheet (see the official rules for details).
  • Get your log in before November!
  • Every submitted entry will be checked and given a final score as part of the adjudication process … but naturally you are welcome to calculate your claimed score and hope that’s close!
  • A veritable profusion of certificates, trophies and plaques will be awarded.
  • Please email the Committee at info@oceaniadxcontest.com if you have any problems entering.
  • Good luck!
  • Click here for the contest rules

 

 

A radio contest designed to encourage community, improve operating skills and encourage the participation of radio users.

 This event is held to commemorate the Amateurs who died during World War II.

This year, the event will be held on the weekend of August 14 and 15, 0300 UTC Saturday to 0300 UTC Sunday.

The Aim of the contest: Amateurs try to contact amateurs in VK call areas, ZL and P2 on all bands except WARC bands. Modes allowed are PHONE, CW and RTTY, modes that were used during WW2. 

The prize for this contest is a perpetual trophy awarded to the state or territory with the best performance.

This is also a great opportunity for shortwave listeners to test their antennas, receivers and reception techniques over the weekend.

Contest Rules

As a mark of respect, stations are asked to observe 15 minutes silence prior to the start of the contest, during which the opening ceremony will be broadcast.

Categories

Single Operator

Single Operator – QRP

Multi-Operator – Single Transmitter (Multi-Single)

Multi-Operator – Unlimited (Multi-Multi)

Sub-Category Modes for Single Operators

Phone (AM, FM & SSB)

CW (CW & RTTY)

Mixed

Permitted Bands

Contacts may be made on MF (160M), HF and VHF & above bands except for WARC bands (10, 18 & 24 MHz) which are excluded by IARU agreement from all contest operations.

HF SSB Voice transmissions should be within:

1843-1875, 3535-3570 and 3600-3700, 7080-7300, 14112-14300, 21150-21450, 28300-29100KHz,

otherwise, disqualification or points reduction may result.

For additional contest rules, how to enter please click here. 

Operators using Ex WW2 equipment will be awarded with a special certificate acknowledging their participation and use of such.

Suitable Tecsun receivers for this contest would be the PL-365, PL-330, PL-880, PL-600 and 660.

 

DRM radio

After many years of stagnation, DRM is emerging as a perfect fit for shortwave broadcasters seeking to increase their audience, and at the same time reducing their energy consumption.

DRM is an open source, non proprietary standard for terrestrial broadcasting, promoted by the DRM Consortium, a group of transmission equipment and receiver manufacturers as well as international broadcasters.

Over 30 broadcasters from around the world now carry DRM broadcasts. The latest schedule can be found here: http://www.hfcc.org/drm/

To receive DRM broadcasts a suitable receiver is required. The GR216 receiver, https://www.tecsunradios.com.au/store/product/tecsun-drm-radio/, promoted by Tecsun Radios Australia is a high-performance receiver, both on DRM and analogue shortwave. It is a self-contained unit, with provision for the connection of external antennas for shortwave and FM.

The receiver includes a self contained linear power supply which eliminates interference caused in  receivers powered by switch mode power supplies.

drm radio australia

 

We recommend an external antenna for good DRM reception and our MW/SW Outdoor Antenna  https://www.tecsunradios.com.au/store/product/tecsun-shortwave-outdoor-antenna/ is most suitable. This antenna incorporates a 9:1 balun to provide the correct impedance for most shortwave receivers with an external antenna socket.

antenna shortwave drm

The typical improvement over the same length of wire without the matching components is between 10 and 15dB in signal level.

A word about antennas:

Directional characteristics of random wire and long wire shortwave receiving antennas are dependent upon the antenna length, height above ground, received frequency and directional orientation of the antenna wire. The four elements are interactive.

Generally the antenna should be aimed so that the transmission source is at 90 degrees to the antenna. So if the transmission source is to the West, run the antenna on a North South direction if possible. This works best on antennas that are less than a quarter wavelength in length and mounted a quarter wavelength above the ground (such as the antenna mentioned above).

In the case of a simple longwire without matching, the length of the wire cut for one quarter wavelength at popular DRM frequencies is as follows:

13Mhz: 6 metres in length, 15Mhz: 5 metres in length, 7 Mhz: 10 metres in length

A simple long wire antenna will work better at greater elevation above the ground, ie the higher the better. Multistrand insulated wire will work better and for longer that solid copper wire, which will weaken with repeated movement.

In practical terms, a DRM receiver with an external antenna will be able to hear most current DRM broadcasts from 13-18Mhz. Check the broadcasting schedule for the appropriate times.

Remember that all times are given in GMT and that means AEST (Australian Eastern Standard Time) is 10 hours ahead of GMT. Hence (for example) the BBC Relay from Singapore on 15620Khz will appear between 2pm and 8pm AEST.

One more factor that can influence the success of your reception is the direction in which the signal is being beamed.

This information is also available on the DRM HF schedule site. If you are in the target area you will have a much better chance of sucessfully receiving DRM broadcasts.

Target areas can be seen here: https://www.drm.org/what-can-i-hear/broadcast-schedule-2/

There are many stations that can be received if suitable attention is paid to antenna orientation, and broadcasting schedules, with more stations being added to the schedule every month.

Good Listening !

How to be prepared for a power cut

                                                                                                                          image via Image via https://www.abc.net.au/news/

At 2 pm on Tues 25th May 2021, a fire broke out in a turbine at the Callide power station in Central QLD causing three generators to be shut down. The scenario of a hydrogen-filled generator exploding or failing mechanically causing hydrogen leaks and then also oil leaks, is probably the worst-case scenario in a coal-fired power station, according to Union representatives.

A further domino effect followed, tripping plants further down the network and causing an electricity outage of almost 500,000 homes from northern New South Wales up to far north Queensland. 

 Chaos ensued with a black-out affecting hundreds of thousands of homes, the Brisbane city traffic lights, shopping centers, sewage treatment plants, and even Gold Coast trams.

The Australian Energy Market Operator (AEMO) requested consumers in Queensland temporarily reduce their energy usage where safe to do so

Thankfully nobody was injured by this incident however, this is a stark reminder that significant power events, similarly, significant weather events ( the two are often related) can occur anywhere at any time.

Is your home prepared for such events?

How to prepare yourself for a power outage.

A severe power outage can last for days, so its a good idea to set aside a day once a year to spend 10 minutes making sure you are prepared if the sudden event of a power outage occurs.

Take an inventory of the items you need that rely on electricity. Plan for batteries and other alternative power sources to meet your needs when the power goes out, such as a portable charger or power bank. Have flashlights for every household member. Determine whether your home phone will work in a power outage and how long battery backup will last.

Make sure you have an emergency radio that can be hand-cranked or solar powered so that you can receive essential emergency broadcasts and instructions when other forms of communications are down. Many top emergency radios feature additional safety features including a flashlight, emergency alarm to attract attention and USB charging. 

How to protect yourself during a power outage.

  • Disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges. Turn off or disconnect appliances, equipment, or electronics. Power may return with momentary surges or spikes that can cause damage.
  • Use a generator if you have one, but ONLY outdoors and away from windows to minimise exposure to carbon monoxide.
  • Do not use a gas stove or oven to heat your home.
  • Keep freezers and refrigerators closed and have alternate plans for refrigerating medicines or using power-dependent medical devices.
  • Tune into your local radio emergency broadcast for updates and directions if you are in an effected area
  • Grab your emergency kit and keep it close.

Thank you to ready.gov for these tips.

Emergency kits are essential in every household, because you don’t need them till you do.

Do you have an emergency kit prepared at home? Click here to see the full list of what essential items you will need to have packed and ready to go. What is in an emergency kit.

Don’t have an emergency radio yet?

We recommend the Best Emergency Radio which is our highest performance AM/FM/SW Solar Powered Radio with inbuilt Solar Panel and Hand Crank Dynamo Charging. Additional features much needed during an emergency are a LED torch and personal alarm, a siren to gain the attention of emergency services and an inbuilt USB charger.

We recommend the DE13 Emergency AM/FM/SW Solar Radio which is an economy model, featuring a torch, personal alarm, inbuilt Solar Panel, and Dynamo hand crank charger that allows you to recharge the internal battery or charge any device by USB or mini USB including your mobile phone. This is the perfect radio to keep for any emergencies.

Click here to shop these products in our online store.

 

bom radio receivers

When you are out to sea, it is crucial to keep on top of the weather forecasts, a change in swell and wind can change the sailing landscape from smooth to challenging.

The Australian Bureau of Meterorology (BOM) Marine Forecast Service provides regular weather forecasts and warnings Australia wide.

This information is broadcast on HF radio for mariners in two formats:

a. Broadcast (voice) of marine weather warnings, forecasts and observations.

b. Broadcast (radiofax images) of marine weather forecast and analysis maps.

The Bureau broadcasts its marine weather HF radio services for high seas and Australian coastal areas from transmitters at Charleville in Queensland and Wiluna in Western Australia. Identifiers are VMC (for services from Charleville) and VMW (for services from Wiluna). Services use USB (F3C) modulation.

VMC (Australia Weather East) broadcasts for the following areas:

· Coastal Waters areas off Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.

· High Seas for the Northern, Southern, North Eastern and South Eastern high seas areas.

Marine weather warnings are broadcast on the hour (on the half-hour in CST) for NT, Qld, NSW, Vic, SA and Tasmanian coastal waters zones and for all high seas areas. The broadcast is available on the following frequencies (kHz):

· Day-time (0700 – 1800 EST): 4426, 8176, 12365, 16546

· Night-time (1800 – 0700 EST): 2201, 6507, 8176, 12365

Navigation Maritime Safety Information notices are broadcast at 25 past each hour on 8176 kHz. Marine forecasts and observations are broadcast from Charleville (VMC) on a four hour repeat cycle, according to the schedule below:

All times are in Eastern Standard time (0700-1800EST) DAY-Time schedule

0730hrs Queensland

0830hrs High Seas (Northern, North Eastern, South Eastern, and Southern areas)

0930hrs New South Wales, Victoria

1030hrs Tasmania

This schedule repeats every four hours until 1800EST after which time, the nigh-time frequencies are used.

When daylight savings is in force, add one hour to EST and CST to obtain Eastern and central daylight time equivalents.

 

VMW (Australia Weather West) broadcasts for the following areas:

· Coastal Waters areas off South Australia, Western Australia and Northern Territory.

· High Seas for the Northern, Western and Southern high seas areas.

Marine weather warnings are broadcast on the hour (on the half-hour in CST) for Qld Gulf, NT, WA and SA coastal waters zones and for all high seas areas. The broadcast is available on the following frequencies (kHz):

· Day-time (0700 – 1800 WST): 4149, 8113, 12362, 16528

· Night-time (1800 – 0700 WST): 2056, 6230, 8113, 12362

Navigation Maritime Safety Information notices are broadcast at 25 past each hour on 8176 kHz. Marine forecasts and observations are broadcast from Wiluna (VMW) on a four hour repeat cycle according to the schedule below:

All times are in Western Standard time (0700-1800WST)

0730hrs Western Australia (Northern Zones: NT-WA Border to North West Cape) NT

0830hrs Western Australia (Western Zones: North West Cape to Cape Naturaliste) Western Australia (Southern Zones: Cape Naturaliste to WA-SA Border)

0930hrs South Australia

1030hrs Queensland (Gulf waters) High Seas (Northern, Western, and Southern areas)

This schedule repeats every four hours until 1800WST after which night-time frequencies are used.

When daylight savings is in force, add one hour to EST and CST to obtain Eastern and Central daylight time equivalents.

 

BOM Marine Weatherfax service:

The BOM Marine Weatherfax service is also broadcast from Charelville (VMC) in the east and Wiluna (VMW) in the west. Both transmitters have a power rating of 1Kw, utilising F3C transmission.

Charleville: Call Sign VMC

 

Frequency: 2628, 5100, 11030, 13920, 20469 kHz

Broadcast (UTC) 0900-1900, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 1900-0900.

 

WilunaL: Call Sign VMW

 

Frequency: 5755, 7535, 10555, 15615, 18060 kHz

Broadcast (UTC) 1100-2100, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 0000-2400, 2100-110

VMC & VMW Radio Fax Schedule

Time (UTC) Description of Item and Current Chart
0000* Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0015 VMC/VMW Schedule – 2 pages
0045 VMC/VMW Broadcast Information
0100 Recommended Frequencies for VMC (Charleville) – 3 pages
0131 Recommended Frequencies for VMW (Wiluna) – 3 pages
0203 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
0245 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0300 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0315 Voice Broadcast Information for VMC and VMW
0345* Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0400 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0430 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
0500* Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
0600 Asian (Area A) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 0000
0623 Asian (Area B) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 0000
0645 Asian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0730 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0745 Australian Total Wave Height and Direction Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0800 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
0830 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0845 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0600
0900 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
0915 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
1015 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+24) valid 0000
1030 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1045 Southern Hemisphere Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 0000
1100 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+36) valid 0000
1115 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0600
1130 Asian Sea Surface Temperature Analysis
1145 VMC/VMW Information Notice
1200 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1215 VMC/VMW Schedule – 2 pages
1245 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1315 South Pacific Ocean Total Waves (H+48) Valid 0000
1330 Indian Ocean Total Waves (H+48) Valid 0000
1345 Pacific Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures
1400 Indian Ocean Sea Surface Temperatures
1415 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+48) valid 0000
1430 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 1200
1500 Australian Primary Swell Waves Forecast (H+24) Valid 0000
1515 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 1200
1530 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
1600 Asian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1630 Recommended Frequencies for VMC (Charleville) – 3 pages
1701 Recommended Frequencies for VMW (Wiluna) – 3 pages
1800 Asian (Area A) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 1200
1823 Asian (Area B) Gradient Level Wind Analysis Valid 1200
1915 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
1930 Australian Total Wave Height and Direction Forecast (H+24) Valid 1200
1945 Australian Primary Swell Waves Height Forecast (H+24) Valid 1200
2000 South Pacific Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
2015 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+24) valid 0000
2030 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis (Manual) Valid 1800
2215 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+36) valid 0000
2230 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast, Days 1 and 2
2245 Southern Hemisphere Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 1200
2300 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast, Days 3 and 4
2315 Southern Ocean Total Wave Height and Direction (H+48) valid 0000
2330 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+36) Valid 0000
2345 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Forecast (H+48) Valid 1200
*The following charts are repeat broadcasts on 11030 kHz only via a directional aerial pointing from Charleville (VMC) towards Tasmania.
0000 Indian Ocean Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0345 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure Analysis Valid 0000
0500 Australian Mean Sea Level Pressure 4-day forecast – 2 pages
Suitable Receivers:

emergency weather warnings radio

Any HF receiver capable of tuning the correct frequencies and receiving SSB transmissions will be suitable for VMC and VMW voice transmissions. To decode facsimilie transmissions an external decoder will be required. The user must be able to access a headphones or line output socket on the receiver to facilitate connection.**

The provision of an external antenna socket is an advantage, this will allow a single wire connection to a backstay or other length of wire to improve reception over the standard telescopic whip.

All broadcast use USB and that mode must be selected on the receiver.

Suitable receivers in the Tecsun range are:
S-2000 desktop, PL-600, PL-660, PL-330, PL-880, PL-990, PL-365, S-8800,

Shop these radios here on our online webshop.

Information source: Australian Bureau of Meteorology

**There exists a radio fax decoder which operates on both Adroid and IOS phones and tablets, which does not require a wired connection.

Simply place your phone or tablet near the speaker of the receiver and the decoder will start.

The App is available from the App Store (HF Weather Fax Marine Radio Fascimile Decoder App) from Black Cat Systems- https://www.blackcatsystems.com/index.html

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Mothers day gift guide

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Mothers day gift guide

 

anzac day military radio history

As ANZAC day approaches this year, it’s a good time to reflect on how radio communications has evolved over time, accelerated by wartime conflicts, and how difficult it must have been during times of conflict.

Prior to the introduction of radio communications, messages during wars were sent using dogs and homing pigeons. Short range communications utilised signalling lamps and mirrors with limited success

Towards the end of World War 1, the introduction of “spark” or “loop” radio sets, operating on the longwave band, and utilising CW (morse code) was recognised as a great step forward in technology. These sets were used between different groups on the battlefield, as great improvement over messengers who were continually under fire from snipers.

In September 1914, one month after the declaration of war, at the battle of Bita Paka, Australian forces attacked the German South Seas Wireless Station on the island of New Britain, conquering German New Guinea.

By the end of World War 1, despite the equipment being heavy and bulky, CW communications had been used by Australian military forces on land, sea and air.

Considered to be more advantageous to naval and airborne forces, where existing telegraph lines could not be employed, this technology paved the way for more advanced voice communications employed after 1920.

Between wars development of radio communications equipment continued, as the benefits of instant communications to direct armed forces was realised.

By 1939 local industry was gearing up to manufacture radio receivers for expected consumer demand of the new technology which provided news and entertainment from around the world.

Governments around the world soon realised that radio was a very effective propaganda tool. Nazi Germany and the British government used it to muster support from their respective populations. In fact the German military arranged the manufacture of millions of radio receivers which were subsidised, allowing access to the general population.

In America, the Office of Co-ordination began providing programming to commercial shortwave stations, in order to spread the news of the war in Europe and the Allied response.

At the end of August 1939 in Australia, all shortwave transmissions professional and amateur, were ordered shut down.

A few weeks after the declaration of war in September 1939, Mr (later Sir) Robert Menzies, the Prime Minister, inaugurated a government controlled overseas shortwave service to counter German propaganda in the Pacific. Initially called “Australia Calling” and using the callsign VLQ2, the service commenced on his birthday, December 20 1939. This service later became Radio Australia.

Whilst telephone and telegraph cables carried some traffic in war zones (a cable was laid under the English Channel between France and England), radio communications became a necessity during World War 2 and the simultaneous development of radar technology accelerated the development of “portable” radio transceivers, so large and heavy that they had to be transported by cart or jeep. In Australia, manufacturers like AWA, STC, Astor (Radio Corporation of Australia) and Kingsley began manufacturing radio equipment for land sea and air forces. Coastwatchers in northern Australia, Solomon Islands and New Guinea used AWA’s 3BZ receiver and 3BZ Teleradio transmitter to intercept Japanese communications and relay important information to the Australian and US navies patrolling the pacific.

3BZ Teleradio system

Typical of the bulky equipment of the time was the Number 11 set was manufactured by AWA. It was a combination transmitter receiver, operating on the HF bands, and drawing 2.9 amps on receive and 3.3 amps on low power transmit (1 watt), a far cry from today’s modern transceivers. It weighed 20Kg.

No. 11 Transceiver Anzac             Subsequent to the World Wars and both before and during the Korean and Vietnam Wars, communications equipment was developed and refined to suit modern warfare techniques.

By the early 1950’s military communications equipment had progressed significantly. AWA were making the A-510 transceiver which was a portable, battery operated, 4 channel crystal controlled transceiver covering 2-10Mhz. Despite the low RF power output of 150mW when using voice communications, the established range was over two miles in the portable configuration and over 100 miles when used with a half wave dipole in “ground station” mode. It weighed 9Kg

anzac radioBy the beginning of the Vietnam War, most military radio communications equipment was manufactured in the USA. Troops in Vietnam used the AN/PRC 25, a valve, multichannel VHF FM transceiver with a power output of 2 watts and a range of approximately 5 miles. It weighed 12Kg. This model was superseded by the PRC-77 which was also VHF FM, had the ability to use voice encryption, and had a solidstate power amplifier, reducing the weight to 6kg.

PRC-77 Transceiver

By the 1970’s AWA was producing a fully solid state HF transceiver covering 2-12Mhz in 1Khz steps, utilising CW and USB modes, operating from an internal Nicad battery, and was capable of 10 watts PEP output power. The receiver drew 35mA, and the entire transceiver including backpack weighed just 9 Kg

This snippet of radio equipment development history allows us to contemplate the huge improvement in performance, and at the same time give thought to those who persevered with heavy cumbersome and poorly performing equipment, during times of conflict.

Lest We Forget.

 

 

Images courtesy of Kurrajong Radio Museum

Tecsun pl 330 shortwave radio

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Read full article below or click link Australian DX News Tecsun review

Tecsun PL330n review.

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